DON'T WEED YOUR WIFE

Siham Karami

What's this? My shredded heart I'm sewing up. 
Our love's old garden? Weeds are growing up. 

So where's your new apartment—sixteenth floor?
I've brought wildflower seeds. Going up?

You're nervous? A bouquet of dandelions!
(I notice a young woman showing up.)

Remember adolescence rushing through—
only kissing seemed worth slowing up. 

We should have weeded out the nasty moments.
Now all we have are seed-heads blowing up. 

An hour alone together's all I ask. 
Embrace a field of larkspur billowing up. 

She looks so cultivated! Peach-painted skin
And angel-eyes. Behold her halo glowing up!

Call me henbit, foxtail, witchgrass, thistle. 
I'm wild and everywhere. Tiptoeing up...

You've done it too—at 3 am, I'm writing,
And you would wail, What are you doing up?

It's only fair. Your dainty lily patch
Is strangled by my knotweed, arrowing up. 

 

SIHAM KARAMI's poetry appears or will appear in The Comstock Review, Measure, Unsplendid, Möbius, String Poet, The Centrifugal Eye, Mezzo Cammin, Angle Poetry, Wordgathering, Loch Raven Review, Snakeskin, Raintown Review, The Lavender Review, Atavic Poetry, Innisfree Journal, and the anthology Irresistible Sonnets, among other places. A Pushcart Prize nominee, she was inspired to write ghazals by the work of Agha Shahid Ali and Roger Sedarat.