RIDDLES FOR THE DARK HERBS:

Liùsaidh

Renaissance Girl’s got you in her wide-eyed stare,
Night-shaded Beauty doesn’t need much to wear.
 
A fell trapper’s lure to the Dark Reaper’s side: 
When hooded monks chant, the wolf should beware. 
 
Good Johnny might kill you with poison-pip pie:
A harvest of appleseed lies everywhere. 
 
Wild weeds, and delirium, lacing the stew:
The flower of Jamestown — the Devil’s own snare!
 
These bruising bells rang in the old ruined kirk:
Those fluttering hearts made the graveyard their lair. 
 
White bridal blooms, dainty, to sicken the milk. 
A snake at its root that strikes unaware.
 
The carrot fern kills in Philospher’s Tea:
A civilised brewing that no-one would share. 

ANSWERS

Deadly Nightshade (Atropa belladonna); Monkshood/Wolfsbane (Aconitum); Appleseeds (Malus domestica); Jimpson Weed/Devil’s Snare (Datura stramonium); Foxglove/Dead Men’s Bells (Digitalis); White Snakeroot (Ageratina altissima); Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum), Curare (Strychnos toxifera) and Sweet Clover (Melilotus officinalis). 

 

LIUSAIDH is the pen name of a poet and writer from the West of Scotland. She misspent her youth working and studying overseas in India, Latin America and East Asia. Her travels provide constant inspiration for her work. Lusidh's poetry is distinguished by memorable characters, strong voice, humour, and passion, with much of her work being in the mythic or Romantic tradition. She writes in diverse poetry styles, preferring to pen her work in sonnets, sapphics, sijo and ghazals. Under her pen name LJ McDowall, she writes contemporary fantasy and literary fiction and is poetry editor for The Quarterday Review, a quarterly poetry market for traditional verse.  Her work is forthcoming online and in print, and her first novel, Anathema, will appear shortly. You can find her at her website ljmcdowall.com and on social media @ljmcdowall.