GHAZAL— ONCE YOU'VE SEEN THE DEEP

Laszlo Slomovits

“He who saw the deep” (Sha naqba imuru)
          — the first words of the Epic of Gilgamesh

You’ll not look for another prize, once you’ve seen the deep.
There’s nothing more to realize, once you’ve seen the deep. 

The ocean of the world is vast and hard to cross.
Your boat of illusion will capsize, once you’ve seen the deep. 

Collect all the knowledge you want, and use it how you will.
You can only call yourself wise, once you’ve seen the deep. 

Sometimes we get glimpses from behind the veil.
The world will drop its dark disguise, once you’ve seen the deep. 

Bring your questions to the sea, bring them to the stars.
From within you’ll hear replies, once you’ve seen the deep. 

Fears and doubts are endless, does life have any meaning?
You’ll know only the body dies, once you’ve seen the deep. 

Have you seen the deep? you ask me. No, but I’m still searching.
Laz, you’ll finally have open eyes, once you’ve seen the deep.

 

GHAZAL— ON THE PATHWAY THROUGH THE STARS

Laszlo Slomovits

There’s a vast, hidden power on the pathway through the stars.
All is sacred, place and hour, on the pathway through the stars. 

Time and space echo each other; all is here this moment.
Or is it always now and never on the pathway through the stars? 

The mind grows dark in the trying, lining out infinity.
But light rings round forever on the pathway through the stars. 

Heaven and hell, above and below, all opposites are mistaken.
Death can never sever on the pathway through the stars. 

“You can’t always get what you want,” they sang.
They were very clever on the pathway through the stars. 

Laszlo, it’s been said, “What is here is also there.”
Lost your love? Find her on the pathway through the stars.

 

LASZLO SLOMOVITS is one of the twin brothers in the nationally-known children’s folk music duo, Gemini. Laszlo has given concerts throughout the U.S. and a number of his award-winning songs are featured in songbooks music teachers use throughout the country. In addition to his performances, song-writing, and recording for children, he has set to music the work of many poets. His recordings of these song-settings include five CDs of the poetry of ancient Sufi mystics, Rumi (translated by Coleman Barks) and Hafiz (translated by Daniel Ladinsky) as well as “White Picture” by the Holocaust-era Czech poet Jiri Orten (translated by Lyn Coffin) and “Cry of Freedom,” the poetry of contemporary American poet Linda Nemec Foster.

Laszlo is currently at work on a new selection of Rumi poems set to music, as well as song-settings of the contemporary American poet Jennifer Burd, with whom he has also collaborated on joint poems and a children’s play. In addition to his work in music, Laszlo has had, and/or is about to have poems published in The Ann Arbor Review, Lilliput Review, Third Wednesday and NEAT, as well as haiku and tanka in Issa’s Untidy Hut, Acorn, and A Hundred Gourds.